Tag: Placemaking

CARTA Director Franck Appointed to City of Denver Task Force

DENVER (JANUARY 9, 2017)  – Christine G. H. Franck, Director of the Center for Advanced Research in Traditional Architecture (CARTA) at the University of Colorado Denver’s College of Architecture and Planning (CAP) has been appointed to Denver’s Department of Community Planning and Development’s (CPD) “Slot Home Evaluation Task Force.” According to CPD, the “task force will assist CPD staff with an evaluation of issues associated with slot home development in Denver’s neighborhoods, and recommend specific zoning text amendments to address identified issues.”

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A typical “Slot Home” development in the West Colfax Neighborhood.

Continue reading “CARTA Director Franck Appointed to City of Denver Task Force”

CARTA | 2016 | Year in Review

2016 has been a banner year for CARTA! As we close out this year, we wanted to take a moment and thank you for your support and highlight all we have accomplished toward our shared vision of a more beautiful, sustainable, and equitable built environment.

View a PDF of the CARTA | 2016 report here: CARTA | 2016, or link through the cover image below.

After learning more, we hope you will join our effort to make traditional design lessons available for architecture, landscape, and urban design students today by including us in your year end giving. A gift of any amount helps, for the future of traditional design in higher education is entirely in your hands.

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Thank you all for your dedication, talent, and the inspiration that your work and wisdom provide us here as we help the phoenix of tradition rise anew,

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Christine G. H. Franck
Director, CARTA

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Precedent: Its Importance and Its Practice | A Lecture by David M. Schwarz

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Precedent has long been integral to architecture. In days past, it was based in history, that which has come before. Not so much today. Precedent, as architecture itself, has found its origins in odd and different places. This talk strives to understand precedent in the architecture of today as its incorporation into the work of David M. Schwarz Architects.

Renowned for their new performing arts centers, sports arenas, urban revitalizations, and numerous civic, cultural, educational, health-care, mixed-use, and multi-family projects, David M. Schwarz Architects sees architecture as both a service and an art. They focus on crafting sustainable, human-centered places in stewardship of the public realm; a philosophy they have studied and developed through their planning and design projects in urban environs since their founding in 1978 in Washington, DC.

Mr. Schwarz received his B.A. at St. John’s College in Annapolis, MD, and Master of Architecture at Yale University. He currently serves as Chairman of the Yale School of Architecture Dean’s Council; a member of the Executive Committee of the Yale University Capital Campaign; and a  jury member of the Richard H. Driehaus Prize of the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. Additionally, he serves as the Jury Chairman for the Vincent J. Scully Prize Fund Endowment of the National Building Museum.


Thanks to the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, this lecture is free and open to all.
RSVP required to attend.
RSVP to: christine.franck@ucdenver.edu or (303) 315-0063.

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From Homemaking to Placemaking

We’re delighted to re-blog Hugh Kavanaugh’s experience on the inaugural European Summer School in Classical Architecture sponsored by the International Network of Traditional Building, Architecture, and Urbanism and the Ax:son Johnson Foundation. Home and place are indeed critical issues today in architecture, urban design, landscape, and planning.

Scrawling from the wreckage

“Architecture that doesn’t respect the past is not respecting the present, because it is not respecting peoples’ primary need from architecture, which is to build a long standing home.” – Roger Scruton

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I have a lot of baggage in regards to architecture. For as long as I can remember I have wanted to be an architect. But when I finally got the chance to study architecture, I failed… dropping out in my third year of study. What I was being taught in college had no bearing whatsoever on what I considered to be architecture, so I turned my back on my studies and instead worked in archaeology over the past 20 years as a surveyor.

However in more recent years I began to become interested in architecture again. This came about mainly by being offered more work carrying out historical building surveys and by discovering INTBAU.

Although my interest in…

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